Tag: baritone sax

Leo P performance on the BBC

Leo Pellegrino (better known as Leo P, and not to be confused with Leo Parker), was recently featured in a tv performance with the BBC. Check out the video below. The dancing might arguably be more impressive than the playing, but its fairly fun to watch and exciting to see people actually appreciate the baritone sax on a fairly wide scale.

The saxophone intro and dancing are especially impressive. The performance eventually leads into an arrangement of the classic baritone saxophone feature by Charles Mingus, ‘Moanin’. The arrangement is very similar to the Mingus Band’s albeit with the addition of the well known Metropole Orchestra and a nice trumpet solo from Christian Scott. Leo seems to be channeling quite a bit of Ronnie Cuber in the rendition, although even in his younger days I don’t believe Ronnie was that fleet of foot.

New York Baritonist Andrew Gutauskas Releases Debut Album

Andrew Gutauskas, a very adept player in the NYC jazz scene has released his first album as a leader. It’s titled “Look Up!”, a reference and homage to his late mentor, Mr. Joe Temperley.

You can check out a few of the tunes, including the the title track below. A beautiful original tune that seems to pay respects to Temperley, and one of his most popularly performed Ellington songs “Single Petal of a Rose”.

The whole band is comprised of fantastic New York musicians, all of whom are quickly becoming the core of the new generation of great musicians.

Those interested in getting the album will find it on iTunes.

Andy has created a beautiful original work that honors a mentor. A tricky line to walk, but I think he has done it beautifully.

New Transcription up: Leo P “My Girl”.

Our thanks go out to Masahiro Totsuka for a new transcription this week. This time we have a new transcription from the young dance-baritone player phenom, Leo P (not to be confused with Leo Parker, the 1940’s R&B/Blues baritonist.) The solo is on the classic pop song “My Girl” from the album NYC from the band Lucky Chops. Head on over to the transcription page to check it out!

Leo P is often seen busking in the NYC Subways and has been gaining popularity with the band Too Many Zoos, which you can check out here.

Help Support Hamiet Bluiett’s Recovery

Hamiet Bluiett is one of the most original baritone saxophonists in the history of the instrument. He’s been a part of many famous musical movements and groups. In the last few years he has begun to struggle with his health, and has recently been hospitalized but is recovering. His family has put together an online fund-raiser to help cover the funds needed for his care especially now that he can no longer work to support himself. Please take a moment and if you’ve appreciated his contribution to music, see if you can help support him. All the details are on the GoFundMe page started by Anaya Bluiett:

https://www.gofundme.com/hamiet-bluietts-recovery

New album from Glenn Wilson

TIMELY CD800S 10Glenn Wilson is a long standing proponent of the baritone sax with multiple albums as a leader and an extensive discography He is adding onto his already impressive collection with a new quintet album titled, Timely. Its a live recording – It swings like crazy and has a really interesting line up of tunes. Check out Glenn’s website here, the album is out today, so be sure to pick up a copy!

Tony Lustig at Birdland – 2/19/2015

Tony Lustig, saxaphoneNYC Jazz Baritone Sax fans will have a chance to catch Tony Lustig and his quintet at their Birdland jazz club debut on Thursday February 19th (6PM). Tony is a monster baritonist, we hope everyone can check it out! Extra details below..

New Gary Smulyan Transcription

Smulyan-press4Thanks to Mark Hiebert we have added a new Gary Smulyan transcription to the transcriptions page!

You’ll also notice that in an effort to be your one-stop-shop destination for all things baritone, we have started posting some additional transcriptions not hosted on this site around the internets. Be sure to check out those sites in depth too.

Always remember that listening to the recording of a transcription is more important than just reading the transcription, and transcribing it yourself will always be more beneficial. That being said, we hope you enjoy.

Keep it low –