James Carter

James CarterJames CarterJames Carter
After Wynton Marsalis, no one caused more of an uproar than James Carter did when he appeared on the New York jazz scene from his native Detroit. Carter’s debut recording, JC on the Set, issued in Japan when he was only 23 and in the States a year later in 1993, was universally acclaimed as the finest debut by a saxophonist in decades. Critics lauded his ability to play in virtually any jazz style without appearing to ape anyone. Carter, who began playing at 11 and studied with trumpeter Marcus Belgrave, was a prodigy. He played and toured with Marsalis in 1986 at the age of 17 and became a member of Lester Bowie’s band upon relocating to New York in 1988. Carter issued no less than six recordings under his own name between 1993 and 2000, all of them with different focuses, from a set of standards, Conversin’ with the Elders in 1995, to an electric funk record, Layin’ in the Cut, to a simultaneously released set in tribute to Django Reinhardt, Chasin the Gypsy. Three years later, he honored the legendary Billie Holiday with Gardenias for Lady Day. Jumping ship from Columbia to Warner Bros., Carter’s Live at Baker’s Keyboard Lounge followed in spring 2004. Another live session, Out of Nowhere, was released in 2005 on the independent label Half Note. Carter has continued his whirlwind of activity, playing on session and in live settings with the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra, Cyrus Chestnut, Rodney Whitaker, Frank Lowe, the late Julius Hemphill, pop-jazz singer Madeleine Peyroux, Ronald Shannon Jackson, Tough Young Tenors, and the Charles Mingus Big Band. ~ Thom Jurek, All Music Guide



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